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Top 20 Best Spring Flowers

Top 20 Best Spring Flowers

Dec 22nd 2023

Nothing could be more exciting than the vibrant colors of spring blooms after the long winter. Early spring is the best time when you can expect to see the best of shrubs, annuals, and perennials. They are a great sight to see once springtime has arrived. Additionally, they are also important for pollinators. Plant a variety of spring flowers and enjoy the magnificent display from late February to mid-June.

Many early bloomers can be planted outdoors because they are tough and can handle frost or even a strong late-spring snowstorm. However, cool spring is when they shine, so plant them as soon as possible and get ready to watch a dazzling show. Here are 20 best spring flowers that show off their stunning blossoms in early spring, which will brighten your day after a long, gloomy winter.

1. Snowdrop

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9

Exposure: Partial shade to shade

Snowdrops, also called Galanthus, should be planted in the fall to bloom in early spring. They mostly appear when there's still snow on the ground. These early bloomers prefer light shade and cooler climates. Rich soil is ideal for their lovely dropping green and white flowers. Moreover, their small stature makes them perfect for woodland or rock gardens.

2. Tulips

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 8

Exposure: Full sun

Tulips are one of the beloved spring flowers that come in almost every color except blue. You can plant this versatile flowering bulb in garden beds, containers, rock gardens, borders, or in landscapes. To grow in your yard, you must sow its seeds in dry soil in the fall. When tulips are blooming they will be a favorite in your garden.

3. Daffodil

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9

Exposure: Full sun to light shade

Daffodil is an easy-to-grow and dependable spring flower that requires minimal care, making it an excellent option for planting by beginners. They have trumpet-shaped flowers in yellow or white colors with a distinct center color like pink and orange. These gorgeous sunny yellow blooms are a must-have for every spring garden. When trimming daffodil stalks, be careful since they release sap that can harm other plants. Plant them in bunches for a beautiful effect compared to planting single bulbs.

4. Pansies

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 10

Exposure: Full sun to light shade

Pansies are popular bedding plants that bloom every year in a wide variety of colors with different markings in the center. They can withstand cold quite well, even snow. Although they require at least six hours of sunlight daily, they love the cold. Pansies will fade as summer arrives, and some varieties will rebloom in fall. They are grown as annuals or biennials.

5. Crocus

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 8

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Crocus is a beautiful light purple early bloomer that is mostly found in mountainous areas. They are best planted in fall in individual pots for a gorgeous springtime display. Their flowers last for around three weeks. They close at night and bloom in the morning. Crocus thrives in well-drained soil and needs sunlight to grow.

6. Pussy Willow

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 8

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

This unique shrub, with its fuzzy little catkins, would make a stunning addition to your yard in late winter and early spring. Cut and store the branches of this spring bloomer to use for decorative purposes. They like sunlight and wet areas, just like all willows.

7. Wallflowers

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 10

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Wallflowers come in nearly every rainbow color and have an amazing fragrance. It's best to plant them after the expected last frost date or in the fall. Wallflowers are short-lived perennials, so they will last just a season or a little more. As their name suggests, they are known to flourish growing between mortars in stone walls. You can keep this spring flowering plant in full sunlight in your yard, and when kept indoors, partial shade will be best.

8. Bleeding Heart

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2 to 9

Exposure: Partial sun

Bleeding heart, also known as Dicentra Spectabilis, is a gorgeous flowering plant to add to your garden. It has little pink, white, or red heart-shaped blooms hanging down each branch above fern-like leaves. They grow best in moist and well-drained soil. Plant bleeding hearts next to bold-leafed plants so they can climb and hide the dying foliage. When the blooms fade, the days get longer, and the temperature rises, these flowers go dormant until next spring.

9. Daisy

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 8

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

This beautiful spring flower is popular for growing in meadows. However, you can also plant this beauty in your garden. Daisies are highly vulnerable to low temperatures. So, make sure to protect the plant to maintain its appearance when the temperature drops. They grow well in well-drained and fertile soil.

10. Primrose

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 8

Exposure: Partial shade

Another early bloomer, primrose, is a hardy flowering plant that comes in multiple bold colors. They thrive in cold climates and prefer well-drained soil and regular water. In addition, primrose can be used as an accent in a container, or it can be naturalized in a woodland setting. Although they differ in size and shape, they look beautiful in large clumps, especially when they are dispersed under trees.

11. Grape Hyacinth

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 9

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Grape hyacinth bears delicate, deep violet, grape-scented flowers that bloom for up to three weeks in early spring. This spring flowering plant grows around 4-6 inches tall when kept in a healthy environment. They require little care and look great along flower beds or in rock gardens. Moreover, their bell-shaped flowers look like grape clusters. They will naturalize easily, so you will have many more of these pretty little flowers every year.

12. Sweet Alyssum

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 9 as annual

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

This tiny annual has a sweet fragrance throughout the spring and is a favorite of pollinators. They come in a variety of colors and sizes. When planting these spring plants, you need to consider the sunlight and water content they require to grow well. Sweet Alyssum blooms best in moderately cold temperatures. The ideal weather for the fully matured growth of the flower is full sun to partial shade. Furthermore, arrange it with spring bulbs or among more upright cold-tolerant flowers like snapdragons.

13. Rhododendron

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 to 8

Exposure: Partial shade

Rhododendrons feature glossy, dark-green leaves that transform into reddish-brown in fall. They bloom in late spring in lovely hues of white, pink, purple, salmon, and peach. However, their show-stopping feature is their striking clusters of cheery orange-red flowers, which bloom in April. They have multiple varieties that are suitable for various seasons, so read the plant description to know what type you are buying.

14. Hellebore

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 9, depending on the species

Exposure: Partial shade

Also called Lenten rose, this beautiful springtime perennial comes in a variety of colors and can brighten up shady areas. Hellebores bloom in early spring and last for at least two months or longer. Their flowers may seem fragile but are quite tough. They grow well in an environment protected from harsh conditions such as intense heat or extreme cold.

15. Winter Aconite

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 7

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Winter aconite is known for being among the first early birds as it blooms from late winter to early spring. This spring bloomer has upward-facing, cup-shaped, bright yellow flowers. Moreover, these plants will frequently push their blooms to appear through the snow. Winter aconites enjoy the full sun during blooming and then the shade when the tree leaves fall from trees overhead. Plant these gorgeous gold buttons in the fall so they can welcome you when winter approaches.

16. Forget-Me-Nots

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 9

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Forget-me-nots are tufted and hairy spring-flowering plants that appear in pink and blue shades. They grow best in soils that are consistently moist, organically rich, and well-drained. Plant these flowers where they can naturalize because they spread aggressively. They thrive in cooler climates and should be planted in late fall for early spring blooms.

17. Daphne Shrub

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6 to 9

Exposure: Full sun and afternoon shade in warm climates

This is a sweet-smelling and little-known shrub that blooms in late winter to early spring. Daphne shrub is a true charmer in the springtime landscape of southern climates. They come in many beautiful species that require minimal care. Most of these plants are evergreen and maintain a lovely round shape. In hot climates, full sun and afternoon shade will work best to maintain the plant growth in your garden or home.

18. Virginia Bluebells

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3 to 8

Exposure: Partial shade to full shade

Many gardeners believe that spring doesn't truly arrive until they see blooming bluebells. When you see these charming blue-violet flowers in bloom, you know spring has come. Bluebells make excellent cut flowers and add beauty to your garden. They are another springtime perennial that goes dormant and disappears after flowering.

19. Lungwort

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 9

Exposure: Full shade to partial shade

Add these fabulous blue and purple colored early spring flowers to shady areas of your garden. It's well-known for its eye-catching foliage with leaves that are dotted and splashed with silver and white. The only bad thing is that these plants fade in summer. Moreover, they require little care, though keeping the soil moist is key.

20. Peonies

USDA Hardiness Zone: 2 to 8

Exposure: Full sun to partial shade

Last on our list, the Peony is a classic and beloved spring flower that is famous for its large, multicolored blooms. You can smell its fragrance from afar. You must plant it in rich, moist soil for it to flourish and look beautiful. However, protect it from severe winds. Peony plants come in shrubs or tree form with single/double flowers that are amazing for fresh bouquets. They'll bloom from early May through June.

There you have it- the list of 20 best spring flowering plants that will fill your garden with gorgeous colors and fragrance when spring arrives. So, grab a pair of gardening gloves, get to work, and be ready to enjoy the breathtaking display of blooms in your garden after gloomy winters.